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Mar. 15th, 2003 | 04:32 pm

LMFAO... This just sounds funny....

The village wants the coyotes gone. However, once the coyotes are trapped, Curtis said, they will not be released somewhere else to put another neighborhood at risk.

They'll use "have a heart" traps that do not hurt the animals to capture them, she said. Then they'll be shot. It's the most humane way to kill the animals without injuring people, she said. Visell said she hopes animal rights activists aren't offended, but the safety of people has to come first.




N. Syracuse sets traps for coyotes
Perhaps it's the cold or less room to roam, but the animals are bolder this year.

March 15, 2003

By Pam Greene Staff writer


The 4-inch paw prints around North Syracuse Cemetery combined with a growing number of sightings leave little to the imagination: a pack of coyotes is roaming North Syracuse.

The village began setting traps in the woods Friday to catch the six coyotes.

Over the past three weeks, at least eight people reported seeing coyotes near the cemetery on South Bay Road. Town officials believe they live in the 10 acres of woods behind the cemetery.

The coyotes are dangerous, said North Syracuse Mayor Jim Hotchkiss. Four of the coyotes appear to be about nine or 10 months old, he said, and the other two are full-grown adults.

"They're bold," Hotchkiss said. "They'll walk near people. It scares people. They don't trust coyotes."

A groundskeeper at the cemetery said a coyote came within five feet of him Feb. 24. It was 9:30 a.m. and Chris LaFirst was shoveling snow when he saw an animal out of the corner of his eye. It was about 12 feet away, he said.

"I thought it was a dog," he said. "But it wasn't a dog."

Their eyes locked, he said, and the animal crept closer and closer until the two were face to face.

"It was skinny," he said. "It looked hungry, like it wanted something to eat."

After a few minutes, he said, the coyote turned and walked away.

At 10 a.m. March 1, LaFirst said, he saw another coyote in the cemetery. There was a funeral later that day, he said, so a police office armed with a rifle was asked to attend.

The village called the state Department of Environmental Conservation, Hotchkiss said, and the state agency recommended that the town hire Karl and Linda Curtis of Manlius. The husband and wife team are independent nuisance wildlife officers, Linda Curtis said.

Hotchkiss, Village Clerk Jane Visell and Curtis went on a mission Friday to spot coyotes. They saw one from their car near the cemetery, they said. It was thin, about three feet long and looked a bit like a German Shepherd, they said.

Coyotes have lived in North Syracuse and throughout Onondaga County for years. Two years ago there were sightings throughout the village, Hotchkiss said. But usually the coyotes stay away from humans. This is the first year they've been so bold, he said, and the first year the village needed to set traps.

New housing developments in North Syracuse may havepushed the coyotes out of their homes, Visell said. Town officials are not sure where the coyotes came from originally. They also don't know if they are rabid.

The reason they're bold, Linda Curtis said, is because the winter was so long and cold. Food is scarce, she said, and the animals are venturing closer to people. The lack of mice, squirrels and rabbits have probably caused the coyotes to hunt pet cats, Curtis said. They could also attack small children, she said.

The village wants the coyotes gone. However, once the coyotes are trapped, Curtis said, they will not be released somewhere else to put another neighborhood at risk.

They'll use "have a heart" traps that do not hurt the animals to capture them, she said. Then they'll be shot. It's the most humane way to kill the animals without injuring people, she said. Visell said she hopes animal rights activists aren't offended, but the safety of people has to come first.

"They're wild animals," Curtis said. "And they could attack people, especially a child."


To stay safe


1. Keep your children and pets with you at all times when outside.

2. Don't put dog or cat food outside. The coyotes haven't gotten into people's garbage cans yet, so it's still safe to put out the trash.

3. Don't go near a coyote, try to feed it or pet it.

4. Call the North Syracuse Village Hall at 458-0900 if you see any coyotes.

Sources: Nuisance wildlife officer Linda Curtis and North Syracuse Mayor Jim Hotchkissnm


© 2003 The Post-Standard. Used with permission.



I just thought it was funny... We don't want to hurt them so we will trap them so they aren't hurt.. but then we are going to shoot them.. LOL

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Comments {5}

james

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from: fgcusabre
date: Mar. 15th, 2003 02:00 pm (UTC)
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lol...can a funeral home also bury pets too...maybe you can make some extra $$$

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(no subject)

from: ophelia_speaks
date: Mar. 15th, 2003 02:34 pm (UTC)
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they die faster by being shot than struggling in a trap for hours until someone gets them out of their misery. it's a question of suffering.

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emily

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from: likeadream
date: Mar. 15th, 2003 02:47 pm (UTC)
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I don't really see what's very funny about it.

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(no subject)

from: ophelia_speaks
date: Mar. 15th, 2003 05:02 pm (UTC)
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I think he meant ironic, in that they were trapping them in a "humane" way and then they just ended up killing them.

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emily

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from: likeadream
date: Mar. 15th, 2003 05:30 pm (UTC)
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Yeah, it does seem ironic. Not quite funny though.

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